May 9, 2018 – Robert, DSD

Kitt Peak Nightly Observing Program

Splendors of the Universe on YOUR Night!

Many pictures are links to larger versions.
Click here for the “Best images of the OTOP” Gallery and more information.

Big Dipper

The Big Dipper (also known as the Plough) is an asterism consisting of the seven brightest stars of the constellation Ursa Major. Four define a “bowl” or “body” and three define a “handle” or “head”. It is recognized as a distinct grouping in many cultures. The North Star (Polaris), the current northern pole star and the tip of the handle of the Little Dipper, can be located by extending an imaginary line from Big Dipper star Merak (β) through Dubhe (α). This makes it useful in celestial navigation.

Little Dipper

Constellation Ursa Minor is colloquially known in the US as the Little Dipper, because its seven brightest stars seem to form the shape of a dipper (ladle or scoop). The star at the end of the dipper handle is Polaris, the North Star. Polaris can also be found by following a line through two stars in Ursa Major—Alpha and Beta Ursae Majoris—that form the end of the ‘bowl’ of the Big Dipper, for 30 degrees (three upright fists at arms’ length) across the night sky.

M104 (Sombrero Galaxy)

M104: A spiral galaxy like the Milky Way, nicknamed the “Sombrero Galaxy” because the lane of dust in the disk looks like the brim of such a hat. It is about 50,000 lightyears across and about 29 million lightyears away.

M51 Whirlpool Galaxy

M51, the Whirlpool Galaxy, gets its name from its bright and prominent spiral arms. It lies at a distance of 23 million light-years away. It also has a smaller, companion galaxy (NGC 5195). The two galaxies are one of the best examples of interacting galaxies.    

M64 Black Eye Galaxy

M64, the Black Eye Galaxy, gets its name from a large dust lane which makes it appear as if the galaxy has a black eye. It lies about 24 million light-years away.

NGC 4565 (Needle Galaxy)

NNGC 4565: The “Needle Galaxy”. A pancake-shaped galaxy a lot like our own Milky Way, seen edge-on from our vantage point. It contains a few hundred billion suns, and is 43 million lightyears from us.

M13 Hercules Globular

M13, the “Great Globular Cluster in Hercules” was first discovered by Edmund Halley in 1714, and later catalogued by Charles Messier in 1764. It contains 300,000 stars, and is 22,000 light-years away. Light would need over a century to traverse its diameter.

M3

M3 is a globular cluster with a half of a million stars. It orbits the core of our Milky Way Galaxy almost perpendicular to the galactic disk. It is currently 33,900 light-years away, and approaching our Solar System at 100 miles per second.

Ecliptic

The ecliptic is a path in the sky, forming a great circle around the Earth, which the Sun and other planets of the Solar System move along. It is formed where the plane of the Solar System intersects with the Earth’s sky.

Meteors

Quick streaks of light in the sky called meteors, shooting stars, or falling stars are not stars at all: they are small bits of rock or iron that heat up, glow, and vaporize upon entering the Earth’s atmosphere. When the Earth encounters a clump of many of these particles, we see a meteor shower lasting hours or days.

Satellites

Human technology! There are almost 500 of these in Low Earth Orbit (we can’t see the higher ones). We see these little “moving stars” because they reflect sunlight.

Zodiacal Light

Zodiacal light is the faint, smooth glow marking the ecliptic (the plane of the solar system). It is sunlight scattered off of gas and dust that orbits the Sun. This is a rare sight, only visible under very dark skies, and best viewed early in the year when the Ecliptic is higher above the horizon.

Coma Berenices

Coma Berenices: “Berenice’s Hair,” a giant Y-shaped open star cluster. It is only 280 lightyears away and appears a bit east of Leo.

M37 Salt & Pepper Cluster

M37, the “Salt and Pepper Cluster” is one of three bright open star clusters in the constellation Auriga. It is the brightest and richest of the three. It lies about 4,500 light-years away, contains about 150 stars, has a diameter of about 25 light-years, and is 450 million years old.   

M44 The Beehive

M44, the “Beehive Cluster,” and also known as “Praesepe,” is a large, bright, diffuse open star cluster containing about 400 stars. It lies fairly close, at a distance of under 600 light-years.

M67

The little open cluster M67 appears near its larger buddy, M44 The Beehive Cluster. These clusters are actually about the same size, but M67 is five times farther away. M67 is old for an open cluster; its stars are four billion years old.    

NGC 2392 (Eskimo Nebula)

NGC 2392: The “Eskimo Nebula.” A round cloud of gas ejected by a dying star. Since this sort of object always appears round, William Hershel named them “planetary nebulae” (he discovered this one in 1787).

NGC 3242 (Ghost of Jupiter)

NGC 3242: The “Ghost of Jupiter.” A shroud of gas puffed off by a dying star, 1,400 lightyears away. The gas is illuminated by the collapsed, hot, blue core (a white dwarf). Did it look blue to you?

Jupiter

Jupiter is the largest planet in the Solar System, a “gas giant” 11 Earth-diameters across. Its atmosphere contains the Great Red Spot, a long-lived storm 2-3 times the size of the Earth. The 4 large Galilean satellites and at least 63 smaller moons orbit Jupiter.

Venus

Venus, the second planet, is the brightest natural object in the sky other than the Sun and Moon and is often erroneously called the “morning star” or “evening star.” It is completely wrapped in sulfuric acid clouds and its surface is hot enough to melt lead.

Algieba (γ Leo)

Algieba (γ Leonis) is a binary star in the mane of Leo, the lion. These two golden-yellow giant stars are about 23 and 10 times the diameter of the Sun, and are about 130 light-years away. Their orbital period is over 500 years. In 2009, a giant planet was found orbiting one of these stars.

Castor (α Gem)

Castor (α Geminorum) is a multiple star in the constellation Gemini, the twins. Through the telescope, a close pair of bright white stars and a more distant red dwarf companion are visible, but these are each spectroscopic binaries, making Castor a six-star system. Castor is about 50 light-years away. The bright components orbit each other with a period of about 450 years.

Iota (ι) Cancri

Iota (ι) Cancri is a binary star in the constellation Cancer, the crab. The brighter star is a pale yellow giant, and the fainter star is smaller and bluish-white. This pair is about 300 light-years away and the stars are almost 3000 astronomical units apart.

Your Telescope Operator and Guide. Thank you for joining me this evening! See you soon!!

The web page for the program in which you just participated is at
Nightly Observing Program. Most of the above images were taken as
part of
the Overnight Telescope Observing Program. For more information on this unique experience please visit Overnight Telescope Observing Program.
Copyright © 2018 Kitt Peak Visitor Center


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One thought on “May 9, 2018 – Robert, DSD

Add yours

  1. Had a wonderful time. As a small group, we had more opportunity to see more ask more questions and Robert was very resourceful. This is a once-in-a lifetime experience worth all the trouble of cool mountain air, total darkness and driving down the hill for a mile without your headlights on. A very pleasant experience.

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