Feb.6 Andy

Kitt Peak Nightly Observing Program

Splendors of the Universe on YOUR Night!

Many pictures are links to larger versions.
Click here for the “Best images of the OTOP” Gallery and more information.

M42 The Orion Nebula

M42, the Orion Nebula is a region of star formation about 1,300 light-years away—the closest to our Solar System. It is roughly 30 light-years across, and contains enough material to make 2,000 stars the size of our sun.

M31 Andromeda Galaxy

The Andromeda Galaxy is our nearest major galactic neighbor. It is a spiral galaxy 2,500,000 light-years away, and has a diameter of 220,000 light-years. This galaxy contains as much material as 1.5 trillion suns.    

M33 Triangulum Galaxy

The Triangulum Galaxy, like M31, is a prominent member of our local group of galaxies. It lies at a distance of 2,900,000 light-years away and is approximately 60,000 light-years across.

M81 Bode’s Galaxy

M81 is a small spiral galaxy, 12 million lightyears away. It is a disk of 50 billion solar masses, only a stone’s throw (150,000 lightyears) from M82.

M82 Cigar Galaxy

M82, the “Cigar Galaxy” is an edge-on spiral galaxy, 12 million light-years away, and perhaps 37,000 light-years across. There are vast gas clouds in this galaxy, where stars are being born at an incredible rate.    

M79

Though dim, M79 is just about the only globular cluster easily seen in the Northern Hemisphere Winter sky. It lies 41,000 light-years away and orbits our galaxy further out than our sun does—unusual since most globular clusters are congregated towards the center of the galaxy.    

Milky Way

That clumpy band of light is evidence that we live in a disk-shaped galaxy. Its pale glow is light from about 200 billion suns!

Satellites

Human technology! There are almost 500 of these in Low Earth Orbit (we can’t see the higher ones). We see these little “moving stars” because they reflect sunlight.

Double Cluster

The “Double Cluster” (NGC 884 and NGC 869) is a pair of two open star clusters that are a treat for binoculars and telescopes alike. Each is a congregation of many hundreds of stars, around 50-60 light-years in diameter. These clusters are both about 7,500 light-years away.

M44 The Beehive

M44, the “Beehive Cluster,” and also known as “Praesepe,” is a large, bright, diffuse open star cluster containing about 400 stars. It lies fairly close, at a distance of under 600 light-years.

M45 The Pleiades

M45, the “Pleiades,” is a bright, nearby star cluster, in the last stages of star formation. About seven stars stand out as the brightest in the cluster, and is why the cluster is also known as the “Seven Sisters,” alluding to the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters from Greek mythology. In Japanese, the cluster is known as “スバル,” “Subaru,” and is featured as the logo of the automobile manufacturer of the same name. The Pleiades lies about 440 light-years away and is a very young (for an open star cluster) 100 million years old.

M1 Crab Nebula

M1: The Crab Nebula. The explosion that created this nebula was seen by Chinese astronomers in 1054 A.D. This explosion was bright enough to be seen in the daytime for almost a month. The nebula is 11 lightyears in diameter and is expanding at the rate of 1,500 km per second.

M76 Little Dumbbell Nebula

M76: “The Little Dumbell”. This complex bubble of gas is the cloud of material ejected by a dying star. This ghostly glow has a fairly bright rectangular component with very dim outer loops. M76 is estimated to be more than 2,500 light years away; which means the bubble of gas is more about 1.2 light years across.

NGC 7662 Blue Snowball

NGC 7662: A planetary nebula nicknamed the “Blue Snowball.” It is a round cloud thrown off by a dying star, expanded to 1.6 lightyears in diameter. The expanding hot gas would have fried any planets orbiting the star.

Mars

Mars, the red planet, has a thin carbon dioxide atmosphere, clouds, dust storms, and polar caps made of dry ice. Images of dry riverbeds from orbiting spacecraft show us that liquid water once flowed on the Martian surface.

Uranus

Uranus, the seventh planet from the Sun, was discovered by Sir William Herschel in 1781. It has a dark set of rings and at least 27 moons. Uranus’s axis of rotation is almost 90 degrees from those of the other planets, as if Uranus has been tipped onto its side.

Almach (γ And)

Almach (γ Andromedae) appears as a golden and blue double star in small telescopes. The blue star itself is actually three stars, too close together to see as individuals, making Almach a four-star system. It is about 350 light-years away, and orbits with a period of several thousand years.

Castor (α Gem)

Castor (α Geminorum) is a multiple star in the constellation Gemini, the twins. Through the telescope, a close pair of bright white stars and a more distant red dwarf companion are visible, but these are each spectroscopic binaries, making Castor a six-star system. Castor is about 50 light-years away. The bright components orbit each other with a period of about 450 years.

Iota (ι) Cancri

Iota (ι) Cancri is a binary star in the constellation Cancer, the crab. The brighter star is a pale yellow giant, and the fainter star is smaller and bluish-white. This pair is about 300 light-years away and the stars are almost 3000 astronomical units apart.

Your Telescope Operator and Guide. Thank you for joining me this evening! See you soon!!

The web page for the program in which you just participated is at
Nightly Observing Program. Most of the above images were taken as
part of
the Overnight Telescope Observing Program. For more information on this unique experience please visit Overnight Telescope Observing Program.
Copyright © 2019 Kitt Peak Visitor Center


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