February 8th, 2019 – Telescope with Carmen

Kitt Peak Nightly Observing Program

Splendors of the Universe on YOUR Night!

Many pictures are links to larger versions.
Click here for the “Best images of the OTOP” Gallery and more information.

M42 The Orion Nebula

M42, the Orion Nebula is a region of star formation about 1,300 light-years away—the closest to our Solar System. It is roughly 30 light-years across, and contains enough material to make 2,000 stars the size of our sun.

M77

M77 is truly remarkable in its extremes. It is 47 million light-years away and at its greatest extent it is 170,000 light-years across (the largest galaxy on the Messier List). Its central portion (shown here) is exceedingly bright—in fact, this galaxy actually changes in brightness due to a black hole in the center.    

Clouds

Kitt Peak has an abundance of clear nights, but that doesn’t mean the clouds never move in. We hope you’ll join us again another time when our dark mountain skies are at their best!

Satellites

Human technology! There are almost 500 of these in Low Earth Orbit (we can’t see the higher ones). We see these little “moving stars” because they reflect sunlight.

Scintillation

The twinkling of star light is a beautiful effect of the Earth’s atmosphere. As light passes through our atmosphere, its path is deviated (refracted) multiple times before reaching the ground. Stars that are near to the horizon will scintillate much more than stars high overhead since you are looking through more air (often the refracted light will display individual colors). In space, stars would not twinkle at all. Astronomers would like it if they could control the effects of this troubling twinkle.

M37 Salt & Pepper Cluster

M37, the “Salt and Pepper Cluster” is one of three bright open star clusters in the constellation Auriga. It is the brightest and richest of the three. It lies about 4,500 light-years away, contains about 150 stars, has a diameter of about 25 light-years, and is 450 million years old.   

M76 Little Dumbbell Nebula

M76: “The Little Dumbell”. This complex bubble of gas is the cloud of material ejected by a dying star. This ghostly glow has a fairly bright rectangular component with very dim outer loops. M76 is estimated to be more than 2,500 light years away; which means the bubble of gas is more about 1.2 light years across.

Mars

Mars, the red planet, has a thin carbon dioxide atmosphere, clouds, dust storms, and polar caps made of dry ice. Images of dry riverbeds from orbiting spacecraft show us that liquid water once flowed on the Martian surface.

Moon

The same side of the Moon always faces Earth because the lunar periods of rotation and revolution are the same. The surface of the moon is covered with impact craters and lava-filled basins. The Moon is about a fourth of Earth’s diameter and is about 30 Earth-diameters away.

Uranus

Uranus, the seventh planet from the Sun, was discovered by Sir William Herschel in 1781. It has a dark set of rings and at least 27 moons. Uranus’s axis of rotation is almost 90 degrees from those of the other planets, as if Uranus has been tipped onto its side.

Almach (γ And)

Almach (γ Andromedae) appears as a golden and blue double star in small telescopes. The blue star itself is actually three stars, too close together to see as individuals, making Almach a four-star system. It is about 350 light-years away, and orbits with a period of several thousand years.

Hind’s Crimson Star (R Lep)

Hind’s Crimson Star (R Leporis), contains lots of carbon in its outer atmosphere, which dims and reddens its starlight. Changing amounts of carbon cause the star to vary in color and brightness, sometimes making it one of the reddest stars in the sky.

Your Telescope Operator and Guide. Thank you for joining me this evening! See you soon!!

The web page for the program in which you just participated is at
Nightly Observing Program. Most of the above images were taken as
part of
the Overnight Telescope Observing Program. For more information on this unique experience please visit Overnight Telescope Observing Program.
Copyright © 2019 Kitt Peak Visitor Center


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