February 8, 2020 – Robert, NOP

Kitt Peak Nightly Observing Program

Splendors of the Universe on YOUR Night!

Many pictures are links to larger versions.
Click here for the “Best images of the OTOP” Gallery and more information.

Andromeda

Andromeda was the princess of myth who was sacrificed by her parents to the sea monster Cetus. Fortunately, the hero Perseus came along to save her, and they were eventually married. The constellation Andromeda is host to the Andromeda Galaxy. Although there are smaller, dwarf galaxies that are closer to our galaxy, Andromeda is the closest big galaxy like our own; in fact, it’s bigger.

Canis Major

Canis Major, the “big dog”, boasts the brightest star in the night sky—Sirius! Also known as The Dog Star because of the constellation it resides in, Sirius is a massive, hot, blue star—and it’s right next door! One of the reasons Sirius is so bright is that it is so close to us—only 8.6 light-years away. It’s name comes from Greek, and means “glowing” or “scorcher”.

Cassiopeia

Cassiopeia is widely recognized by its characteristic W shape, though it may look like an M, a 3, or a Σ depending on its orientation in the sky, and your position on Earth. However it’s oriented, once you’ve come to know its distinctive zig-zag pattern, you’ll spot it with ease. The plane of the Milky Way runs right through Cassiopeia, so it’s full of deep sky objects—in particular, a lot of open star clusters. Cassiopeia is named for the queen form Greek mythology who angered the sea god Poseidon when she boasted that her daughter Andromeda was more beautiful than his sea nymphs. 

Lepus

Lepus is a smaller, medium brightness constellation. It can be found immediately to the south of the constellation Orion, at the feet of the hunter. The best known star of Lepus, is not one that is visible to the naked-eye. R Leporis, also known as Hind’s Crimson Star, is a ruby red carbon star. Just take a look with a telescope and see how strikingly red it is compared to other stars. An abundance of carbon in the star’s atmosphere filters out certain wavelengths of light, giving the star its extra red appearance.

Orion

Orion is a famous constellation, well known especially for the Belt of Orion—three stars in a line at what seems to be the waist of a human figure. The bright stars Rigel and Betelgeuse are two of the brightest stars in the sky. Between the Belt and Rigel you can see the Orion Nebula—the closest star forming region to our Solar System. A beautiful object in a telescope or binoculars, you can also just make out the nebula naked-eye.

M42 The Orion Nebula

M42, the Orion Nebula is a region of star formation about 1,300 light-years away—the closest to our Solar System. It is roughly 30 light-years across, and contains enough material to make 2,000 stars the size of our sun.

M31 Andromeda Galaxy

The Andromeda Galaxy is our nearest major galactic neighbor. It is a spiral galaxy 2,500,000 light-years away, and has a diameter of 220,000 light-years. This galaxy contains as much material as 1.5 trillion suns.    

M79

Though dim, M79 is just about the only globular cluster easily seen in the Northern Hemisphere Winter sky. It lies 41,000 light-years away and orbits our galaxy further out than our sun does—unusual since most globular clusters are congregated towards the center of the galaxy.    

Satellites

Human technology! There are almost 500 of these in Low Earth Orbit (we can’t see the higher ones). We see these little “moving stars” because they reflect sunlight.

M41

M41 is an open star cluster located just below the brightest star in the night sky, Sirius. It contains about 150 stars spread out over 25 light-years, and is 2,300 light-years away.

Moon

The same side of the Moon always faces Earth because the lunar periods of rotation and revolution are the same. The surface of the moon is covered with impact craters and lava-filled basins. The Moon is about a fourth of Earth’s diameter and is about 30 Earth-diameters away.

Venus

Venus, the second planet, is the brightest natural object in the sky other than the Sun and Moon and is often erroneously called the “morning star” or “evening star.” It is completely wrapped in sulfuric acid clouds and its surface is hot enough to melt lead.

Achird, Eta Cas A & B

Achird is a star very similar to our own Sun, found in the northern sky within the constellation Cassiopeia. A yellow-white class G dwarf with a surface temperature of 5730 Kelvin, Achird is a bit cooler than our Sun, but slightly brighter and larger. Its is a mere 19 light years away. Achird stands out next to its cooler companion, an orange class K dwarf. The proximity of the pair when viewed through a telescope helps the viewer distinguish a subtle difference in color. The fainter companion is much cooler, smaller, and dimmer than our Sun. The pair orbit each other every 480 years, and are seperated by 70 astronomical units (6.5 billion miles).

Your Telescope Operator and Guide. Thank you for joining me this evening! See you soon!!

The web page for the program in which you just participated is at
Nightly Observing Program. Most of the above images were taken as
part of
the Overnight Telescope Observing Program. For more information on this unique experience please visit Overnight Telescope Observing Program.
Copyright © 2020 Kitt Peak Visitor Center


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